Thursday, November 26, 2009


BRONX ,NEW YORK...........A study by the BRONX AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY PROJECT(BAAHP) of Fordham University,New York has revealed that African Immigrants in the Bronx are impacting positively on the Bronx economy and the New York state as a whole.

The research revealed how African Immigrants in their quest to integrate in their new found country, take up challenging jobs and establish business's in the Bronx to help the economy.The Bronx by far has the largest concentration of African Immigrants in the whole of the United States of America.By statistics,Ghanaians are the largest of these immigrants in the Bronx."The Ghanaians work so hard,they drive the cabs,work in the hospitals,Nursing Homes and other institutions and services that support the growth of this nation"Dr Naison ,the chief investigator of the project said.

He intimated that the the African Immigrants do all of odd jobs ;But they ensure they give their children the best of education,citing an example of one of his student at Fordham University whose parents lived in the Bronx ,did odd job but gave her quality education and now works with the Federal Reserve.

The African Immigrants are now helping to demystify the Bronx which hitherto was associated with violence and gangsterism,and other forms of unpleasant happening that led to Bronx receiving bad media publicity. "They are helping to shape up the Bronx and I'm excited about this, it will go into the history of the Bronx on the role African immigrant especially Ghanaian played in the direction" said Dr Naison.

The study of African immigrants in the Bronx under the African immigration research of the BAHHP is partly funded by the Carnegie foundation and is under directorship of Dr Jane Kani Edward. "The research intends to document and analyzes the life history of African immigrant, families, housing, race, relations, pattern of immigration, music, art, sports, religion, political and economic and gender issues among others."Dr.Edward.So far,the African Immigration Research of the Bronx African American History Project(BAACHP) has interviewed prominent Ghanaians resident in the Bronx notably among them is krontihene a Ghanaian Hiplife Superstar living in the Bronx.

The Bronx has a lot of African Immigrant institutions,these include :Houses of worship-churches and mosques,African owned Markets,restaurants,hair salons,Law Firms,movie and music stores,boutiques,community organizations and other social cultural and economic institutions.
It is amazing how the African Performs when giving the conducive platform outside the African continent.What then is our problem back home?
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Monday, November 23, 2009


  LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA…….23 Nov. Trust me the Ghanaian can do everything and anything for money, just to keep body and soul alive.  On the streets of the United State of America specifically Los Angeles, is Afua Owusu Afriyie; Aka Afua the model. A  Ghanaian born at Agogo in the Ashanti Region of Ghana and grew up in Germany, who poses Nude to express her artistic feelings. She claims she worked with renowned photographers like, Bruce Talbot, Andre Lavelle, Sita Mae, and a host of others.
She poses for the cameras naked because she feels that is her own form of art.  As to how she got into this kind of job, which is culturally not accepted by Ghanaians, seeing it as a despicable act, as far as the Ghanaian woman is concerned.  “MY MOTHER ALLOWED HER BODY TO BE USED FOR SEX, I WOULD USE MY BODY BUT IN A DIFFERENT WAYAfuamodel.  She is 26 years and started modeling at the age of 14years as to whether she was modeling in the nude or not you have to figure it out after reading her story.  A visit to her website revealed the real work of nudity of this great and proud daughter of Agogo Ashanti Akim. Thus, making her the daughter of the Omahene; Courtesy the Akan tradition, Afua loves Batman Samini a great musician in Ghana whom I also admired.  Checking her webpage, Oh my word …………….. THIS IS AFUA’S STORY.
I am the product of passion not love, my life seemed too followed in suit constantly searching to fill that void.
I was born in Africa and raised by my grandmother in a small-impoverished village in Ghana. I remember as a child the feeling of starvation; the feeling of the hot ground on my feet not having shoes to wear until I was eight years of age, the scars on my body tell the story of a complicated existence.   

I didn’t know much of my father or mother during my infancy.
My parents left Africa and moved to Europe in the hope of securing a better life; Their relationship did not survive the hardships associated with their struggles as illegal’s in a foreign country. My father left my mother there and returned to Ghana, left to survive on her own with no work documents and little education she used her body to survive.
This is how she came to meet the man who would become my stepfather; and at the age of eight I would leave Ghana and begin a new in Germany.
However, my new life would gradually fall apart as I would come to experience the damaging effects of racism and domestic abuse. And as my physical development out grew my emotional maturity I would gradually become the victim psychological, physical and sexual abuse. 

I wandered aimlessly looking for acceptance and what I thought was love, allowing opportunists to capitalize on my naiveté and desperation for affection. I found myself falling into a pattern of bad choices and realized I needed to make some drastic changes in my behavior and surroundings.

I came to the United States with a dream of happiness and living a good life with who I thought at the time was the love of my life, upon arriving I found that happiness fleeting. I was somewhat coerced into marriage with the thoughts of expediting our work papers and citizenship. I found it all to be a lie... and within a few months I would find myself alone in a strange new country, battered and bruised with no source of income. I suddenly realized I had followed in my mother’s footsteps, following my heart, leaving my family behind to try and start a new life somewhere else only to be mistreated, violated and abused.
Left to fend for self with no means of doing so, I was a young woman without a green card or work visa, my resources and friends were limited, I felt betrayed, bitter and angry, but I was unwilling to concede to failure. I; like my mother had to make several hard yet necessary choices to survive.
My mother allowed her body to be used for sex; I would use my body also, but in a different way. I fell into modeling as a means to survive and help my family situation.
My views on sex and nudity are from the standpoint of my European upbringing and my African heritage. I am open enough to admit I enjoy what I do; I find pleasure in being nude and being admired. I enjoy working with talented people to produce visual art, and have posed for and with both amateurs and professionals and on a few occasion have allowed the lines to be blurred between professional conduct, the illusion of art and personal fulfillment.
This is all a part of learning and growth, and although I've made mistakes along the way I can honestly say I'm not ashamed of any of the decisions I have made.
I believe if you are honest with yourself and who you are and express that honesty you should have no regrets... My focus is clear, I'm here in the States and although I've hit more than a few roadblocks, I can still dream, this site will assist in making some of those dreams happen; my dreams are simple.
It is my intent to use this website as a medium to raise awareness, to inspire others, to educate and inform as well as entertain. I hope to generate revenue not only for my own preservation but to assist my family still struggling in Africa. My young relatives, who like me as a child walk without shoes, might feel the pains of huger in their bellies or need something as simple as a doll to play with.
Is her story true? How are you going to react to it as a Ghanaian, most unfortunately when she has the Ghana national flag as a background on her

SOURCE: Ekow Mensah-Shalders

Thursday, November 19, 2009


As from next summer,Fordham University will start teaching Twi at the University's department of African and African-American Studies.

The motivation ,according to the chairman of the department Professor Mark Naison is as a
result of the growing number people who transact business in the Bronx using Twi as the
medium of communication."It is amazing to see people communicating in Twi ,not thousand ;but tens of thousand.The churches ,African shops,African Restaurants and Food Joints just name them"

Fordham University is taking the lead in this area due to it's location and will be the only University in the New York to offer Twi.All is set for the Twi class to take-off during the summer section one class of 2010.Mr.Kojo Ampah Sahara,a Ghanaian studying at the RoseHill campus of Fordham University where the program will be held and leader of the African Cultural Exchange an umbrella organization that promotes African culture and values hinted that the course will be handled by a seasoned Ghanaian professor based in Connecticut ,Ben Hayford.
Twi specifically Ashanti Twi is a language spoken by about 10 million people in Ghana (West Africa).It is one of the three(3) mutually intelligible dialect of the Akan language ,the others being Akuapim Twi and Fante which belong to the Kwa language family. Kwa means a group of African language in the Niger-Congo group spoken from Ivory coast to Nigeria.

In Ghana,Twi is spoken in the Ashanti Region, parts of the Eastern,Western,Central,Volta and BrongAhafo Regions.The university is proud to undertake this enterprise as it will help teachers,social workers and others who will be working in the Bronx communities where Twi is spoken.

It is expected that students from other Universities in New York who are interested can be part of the course which will begin with 40 students.
Once again Ghana will be in the spotlight as the course will also look at the various cultural practices of the Akans.